Category Archives: Living in a Smart City

STANDARDIZATION: LIVING IN SMART CITIES OF THE FUTURE

IEEE and DKE host workshop in Offenbach, Germany as well as joining forces with other organizations to explore smart grid technologies and applications enabled through globally relevant standards.

IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) announced yesterday the “STANDARDIZATION: LIVING IN THE SMART CITIES OF THE FUTURE eWork, eMobility and Connecting to Smart Grids” workshop co-hosted with DKE German Commission for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies of DIN and VDE.

This exclusive event sees DKE and IEEE-SA are partnering for the first time to provide practical information on home networking, next generation mobility, smart cities, and their integration with smart grids.

The agenda features a cross-section of experts from DKE and IEEE-SA:

        -  Keynote
           Dr. Bernhard Thies, Chairman of the Board of Directors, DKE
           Secretary of the German National Committee of IEC and CENELEC.
        -  Introduction of IEEE-SA and its Smart City Activities
           Building consensus across many technologies.
           Dr. John Kulick, Senior Staff Consultant Corporate Standards and
           Guidance,
           Siemens Corporate Technology, Siemens Corporation
           Vice-Chair, IEEE-SA Standards Board
           Trends in home networking and Smart Grid powerline communication
           technologies
           Oleg Logvinov, Director Market Development, Industrial & Power
           Conversion Division, STMicroelectronics
           Member IEEE-SA
        -  Introduction of DKE and its Smart City Activities
           Smart Grid meets Smart Building - how standards can help to bridge
           the gap
           Dr. Rolf Apel, Manager Technology and Innovation, Siemens AG.
        -  IEEE-SA and DKE Perspectives on Next Generation Mobility and the
           Grid
           eMobility: standards and technology - trends, issues, and the future
           impact of electric vehicles
           Paul Bishop, President & Chief Engineer, The Bishop Group.
           Chair, IEEE P2030.1(TM) Working Group.
           Standard Proposal for Resonant Inductive Charging of Electric
           Vehicles
           Samuel Kiefer, CEO, Kiefermedia GmbH.

The workshop also features an interactive panel discussion and a tour of the new VDE Battery Test Center, which is included in the registration fee.

The DKE/IEEE-SA workshop will be held on 10th July 2012 at the Sheraton Offenbach Hotel, in Offenbach, Germany. For additional information and to register for the event visit: http://conference.vde.com/ieee-dke/Pages/LIVINGINTHESMARTCITIESOFTHEFUTURE.aspx

Smart Cities in Action

The world’s first total-concept smart grid deployment project, PowerMatching City, has been placed on the Sustainia 100list of solutions. Sustainia 100 describes itself as “More than a model and a vision, Sustainia aims to be the world’s one-stop toolbox for sustainable solutions.”

PowerMatching City, The Netherlands, is the first real-life smart grid community in the world which delivers the world’s first results from a total concept smart grid deployment project.

The city currently involves 25 households connected with each other and fitted with fully functioning micro combined heat and power systems (CHP). Systems in place include high efficiency boilers, hybrid pumps, smart meters, PV panels, electric vehicle charging stations and other smart household appliances which when combined together make up the smart energy system.

“With the share of renewable energy going up strongly over the next decades, the rising demand for electricity, and consumers who are increasingly providing their own energy supply, it is evident that smart grids will have an essential position in our future energy system. PowerMatching City plays a pioneering role in the development of smart grids and in the transition towards a sustainable energy system,” said Frits Bliek, Program Coordinator, PowerMatching City.

It is hoped that the grid will continue to grow, with the next phase set to include a further 70 homes. Follow the link below for the video!

PowerMatching City (www.PowerMatchingCity.nl)

 

 

Connected Liverpool at Ovum Smart Cities Europe Conference 2012

Connected Liverpool was proud to contribute to the Ovum Smart Cities Europe Conference 2012 which was held in London last week. Jordy van Kuijk of our Innovation Lead, Connected Liverpool, spoke at a panel discussion about “Who Invests and Who Benefits from New Digital City Services?” under the umbrella of creating New Business Opportunities in Digital Cities within the Smart City industry.

The panel discussion was led by Don Strickland, President and CEO at Strickland & Associates and former President & CEO at iPIX, former Vice President at Apple Computer and former Vice President at Eastman Kodak. Besides Don Strickland, the following panelists joined the panel discussion:

  • Gianni Carbonaro, Head of the Municipal and Regional Unit, European Investment Bank
  • Allan Mayo, Head, Business Services Policy Unit, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
  • Kai Hendry, Managing Director at Webconverger
  • Jordy van Kuijk, Innovation Lead, Connected Liverpool

Each panelist was given the opportunity to introduce himself and highlight his interest in the Smart City industry to continue the discussion around the main topic of Who Invests and Who Benefits from New Digital City Services?. We have asked Jordy to comment shortly on his experience within the panel.

“It was interesting to be on a panel with such inspiring figures that speak the same language and have aligned objectives to empower citizens and businesses to make use of the many commercial opportunities that the Smart City industry has to offer.

I was asked to share my vision on how technology can lead to new business opportunities within the digital city framework and specifically clarified the opportunities that are provided to us through mobile technology. Currently, with a world population of 7 billion, there are 5.9 billion mobile phones worldwide compared to the 2 billion internet users, the 1.2 billion personal computers and the 1.7 billion televisions. 16% of those 5.9 billion mobile phones are smartphones, which is predicted to grow to 1 billion smartphones by 2013. On average, people look at their phone 150 times a day (every 6 minutes) and even though not everyone can afford a smartphone, it is expected that the average price will decline from $600 (2011) to $10 dollar in 2020 as production costs will decline drastically.

Currently, 11% of the Americans are already using their smartphone to make their payments through mobile banking and contemporary technology such as NFC, RFID and Augmented Reality are given new dimensions all over the world. Through this, more and more businesses will be stimulated to start operating in this mobile technology space to develop smart applications/ mobile software that can increase people’s quality of life and assist them in their daily activities. The NFC reader that allows people in Stockholm to check-into their hotel rooms without any human contact and allows students at the Arizona State University to enter their dorms and rooms is an example of such a smart application enabled by mobile technology. This opened up a completely new market which will experience significant grow in the upcoming years providing SME’s with plenty of commercial opportunities. As this smart mobile technology will also be taxable, it also opens up a new income stream for the government. It is an exciting space to be in and I would advise any mobile technology entrepreneur to get involved”

One of the topics that was raised by the audience was the difficulty for entrepreneurs to acquire public capital to develop IT prototypes and market their innovative products and services. Entrepreneurs seem to struggle to finding public funding and even though the TSB and other public bodies are offering opportunities for funding, this is often poorly communicated with entrepreneurs.

Moreover, the aspect of ‘Trust’ was emphasized. As we are shifting towards a new era of opening up data and making government data more transparent, citizens are worrying about their privacy. Making public data available will create an important resource for SME’s as it will motivate them to make use of this data for commercial purposes. Nevertheless, clear standards of data usage will have to be established to ensure people’s privacy is guaranteed.

Overall, we were proud to be part of this exciting conference which was perfectly aligned with our own vision within Connected Liverpool. We’ll keep you posted about any new developments that will help us to build a smarter Liverpool City Region!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Smart’ built environment

It is very important to think about how the built environment can maintain more sustainable lifestyles. This is because there are a lot of critical challenges facing the world. Like resource scarcity, climate change, increasing population, increased urbanization and burgeoning middle classes. And one of the most important facts, that 70% of current building stock will still exist in 2030. So the built environment should encourage and support sustainable lifestyles in terms of both efficiency and wellbeing.

The built environment can contribute to the social elements of sustainability by enabling healthier lifestyles and greater community cohesion through design. It can also contribute to a greater sense of wellbeing. An example of this is the collaboration between city agencies in New York that led to the publication of Active Design Guidelines. These guidelines highlight the opportunities to increase changes for physical activity and active transportation in everyday places. And the guidelines say that they want more attractive buildings and more engaging places for the encouragement of positive changes to public health.

The future of the built environment will also be inspired by the natural world. There already are some projects like Biomimicry and living architecture that have set the trend. Another example is the Coldharbour Lane in London where green roofs provide green space in high density urban areas. These green roofs also provide biodiversity and thermal insulation and they are based on Skanska’s ModernaHus concept.

But it’s not just the built environment that will change because of Smart technologies, they way citizens interact with the built environment will also change. Technologies enable buildings to respond to external conditions like the weather and time and adjust accordingly. Invisible  impacts can be made visible with data visualization. This has a positive impact on the behavior of those who use the buildings.

It is important to think about how the buildings of the future can stand up to new and different challenges. Innovative and creative technologies must be used in these buildings. But we must keep in mind that the buildings of the future will also be the buildings of today, adjusted with technologies. Professionals within the building environment and other, external stakeholders will have to work together to enable that buildings will be fit for purpose in the future. And infrastructures will have to be more efficient while also contributing to the health and wellbeing of the people.