Tag Archives: connected cities

Connected Liverpool in London

Yesterday was another inspiring day at the Connected Liverpool office. CEO Lee Omar and Innovation Lead Jordy van Kuijk traveled to London to meet up with CTO Paul McGrath and the well respected Ajit Jaokar, Director/Principal – futuretext, in London. The Connected Liverpool team was reunited.

After an excellent meeting at the top floor of The Gherkin, the Connected Liverpool team traveled to the Royal Mint Court, the home of Liverpool’s Business Hub in London. The Royal Mint Court is situated opposite the Tower Bridge and the Tower of London and is just a few minutes walk to Liverpool Street Station, an amazing location. Connected Liverpool used the Business Hub’s meeting room facilities to brainstorm and strengthen its strategy to transform Liverpool into the first Smart City in the UK allowing it to sharpen its focus to create one coherent cross-departmental strategy. It was a fruitful brainstorm session full of innovative ideas and thoughts.

At 6 p.m. sharp, the Connected Liverpool team had a meeting with Max Steinberg, Chief Executive of Liverpool Vision, to discuss the journey of making the Liverpool City Region (1.5 million citizens) smarter and better-connected. Meeting Max Steinberg was essential to ensure that Connected Liverpool is heading in the right direction to realise its vision of increasing the quality of life of the Liverpool City Region residents, to empower them to achieve more, and to revitalise the city region economy. Global smart city best practices and initiatives were discussed while considering the aims and objectives as set out in The City Deal and The Mayoral Development Corporation. Additionally, significant attention was paid to the collaboration between the public and private sector in Liverpool and the way Connected Liverpool should be taken forward.

At 7 p.m., Connected Liverpool joined the London Autumn Business Club event which was chaired by Chris Heyes, Head of Liverpool in London. With key note speaker Max Steinberg and networking afterwards, it was an exciting event with entrepreneurs and the public sector both active in Liverpool and London hosted in The Heron Tower.

All together, it was an excellent day full of ideas and thrilling meetings with the right people. Connected Liverpool took the excitement back to Liverpool with only one aim:

LET’S MAKE LIVERPOOL SMARTER!!

 

 

 

Connected cities are needed to survive the urban growth

The UK government wants the UK to be the technology centre for Europe this year. But to achieve this, they will have to look at every part of their economy. One area that is being closely looked at lately is our cities. To drive growth, cities need to be more connected. These highly connected cities need to be driven by super-fast connectivity and they can help drive the British innovation over the next few years.

But if the UK wants highly connected cities in the future, they need to start planning things now. And they already have been thinking about this. An example is the Intel Collaborative Research Institute (ICRI) for Sustainable Connected Cities. ICRI is a joint effort between two of London’s top universities: University College and Imperial College London.

Social, economic and environmental challenges need to be tackled and it’s up to this new institute to investigate how technologies can help tackle these issues. They want London to become a ‘smart city lab’ and they want to create a blueprint for ‘connected cities’ in the UK.

So the researchers of this new institute will investigate some of the new intelligent technologies to use on our cities. An example is the network of sensors that can be used to quickly access data on trends for traffic, pollution and water supply. If they have all this data, they can analyze it to see how well the city is operating. Norway already has a centralized data platform like this called ‘CityData’.

A real-life application of this can be the traffic monitoring. Traffic congestions can be monitored and analyzed to develop smart transport timetabled and alerts. Councils could start to target areas to send more wardens, re-route traffic or provide warnings on mobile apps.

But this can only work when you have a huge amount of data at hand. So the right tools and bandwidth need to be in place first before you can start capturing and carrying these high volumes of information. When the connectivity isn’t restricted to just big businesses but to all of the city, innovation and growth can be stimulated and can flourish.

So using data more wisely is a very good new innovative approach to cities. London is already embracing this with as an example the London Gird for Learning (LGFL). All 33 London local authorities are involved in LGFL, and it’s making the most out of a dedicated public services network. It’s already providing schools with new technologies like e-learning tools such as video conferencing, virtual learning platforms and podcasts.

By 2050, there will be about nine billion people on this world, and most of them will be living in urban spaces. If cities don’t prepare systems to manage every aspect of the way a city operates, they will be challenged in all sorts of ways.  So cities need to start investing today in forward-thinking research and super-fast connectivity that will make the ‘connected cities’ reality.