New curriculum: A crash course in the digital economy

Digital economy

Higher education has a well recognised crisis: the gap between what is taught in business schools and what is expected by managers in high growth industries of their incoming employees.

It is a chasm that leads to unemployment, underemployment, and disengagement for the Millennial workforce, and frustration for enterprises who cannot find and retain qualified employees for jobs unfilled.

Higher Education institutions tend to resist innovation. They are risk-averse, while being overly concerned with maintaining tradition. It is easier for departments and professors to keep doing what they have been doing in prescriptive, conventional methods rather than find new ways to deliver education as a service in innovative and effective ways.

The solution is to engage students in active learning by applying the latest business research and enterprise architecture models to real business challenges. As a result of incorporating the use of social business, big data, mobility and cloud computing into the curriculum students leave prepared with the skills they’ll immediately use to service customers and collaborate with colleagues and partners in today’s global and digital economy.

This is exactly what Hult International Business School and IBM have partnered to do.

In an effort to combat the growing skills gap, IBM and Hult International Business School have partnered to create a first-of-its-kind curriculum that is focused on the emergence of the digital service economy, dedicated to preparing today’s graduate student with the critical skills they’ll need to be competitive and successful in today’s increasingly social and digital business landscape.

IBM and Hult are working to educate and enable students with skills that best serve today’s global, mobile and social customer. This new academic program provides Hult students with the opportunity to deepen technical and business skills in areas such as enterprise social networking, which has seen a significant uptake in adoption over the past five years and continues to grow and transform how organisations do business.

The new curriculum is part of Hult International Business School’s Corporate Partnership Elective program, and brings together MBA students with IBMers to help address the need for skills in areas like social business and analytics. Hult approaches the partnership with IBM as an opportunity for systematic innovation to improve its capability to bridge the gap between business education and the skills/competencies global hiring managers seek.