Category Archives: Europe

STANDARDIZATION: LIVING IN SMART CITIES OF THE FUTURE

IEEE and DKE host workshop in Offenbach, Germany as well as joining forces with other organizations to explore smart grid technologies and applications enabled through globally relevant standards.

IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) announced yesterday the “STANDARDIZATION: LIVING IN THE SMART CITIES OF THE FUTURE eWork, eMobility and Connecting to Smart Grids” workshop co-hosted with DKE German Commission for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies of DIN and VDE.

This exclusive event sees DKE and IEEE-SA are partnering for the first time to provide practical information on home networking, next generation mobility, smart cities, and their integration with smart grids.

The agenda features a cross-section of experts from DKE and IEEE-SA:

        -  Keynote
           Dr. Bernhard Thies, Chairman of the Board of Directors, DKE
           Secretary of the German National Committee of IEC and CENELEC.
        -  Introduction of IEEE-SA and its Smart City Activities
           Building consensus across many technologies.
           Dr. John Kulick, Senior Staff Consultant Corporate Standards and
           Guidance,
           Siemens Corporate Technology, Siemens Corporation
           Vice-Chair, IEEE-SA Standards Board
           Trends in home networking and Smart Grid powerline communication
           technologies
           Oleg Logvinov, Director Market Development, Industrial & Power
           Conversion Division, STMicroelectronics
           Member IEEE-SA
        -  Introduction of DKE and its Smart City Activities
           Smart Grid meets Smart Building - how standards can help to bridge
           the gap
           Dr. Rolf Apel, Manager Technology and Innovation, Siemens AG.
        -  IEEE-SA and DKE Perspectives on Next Generation Mobility and the
           Grid
           eMobility: standards and technology - trends, issues, and the future
           impact of electric vehicles
           Paul Bishop, President & Chief Engineer, The Bishop Group.
           Chair, IEEE P2030.1(TM) Working Group.
           Standard Proposal for Resonant Inductive Charging of Electric
           Vehicles
           Samuel Kiefer, CEO, Kiefermedia GmbH.

The workshop also features an interactive panel discussion and a tour of the new VDE Battery Test Center, which is included in the registration fee.

The DKE/IEEE-SA workshop will be held on 10th July 2012 at the Sheraton Offenbach Hotel, in Offenbach, Germany. For additional information and to register for the event visit: http://conference.vde.com/ieee-dke/Pages/LIVINGINTHESMARTCITIESOFTHEFUTURE.aspx

Smart Cities in Action

The world’s first total-concept smart grid deployment project, PowerMatching City, has been placed on the Sustainia 100list of solutions. Sustainia 100 describes itself as “More than a model and a vision, Sustainia aims to be the world’s one-stop toolbox for sustainable solutions.”

PowerMatching City, The Netherlands, is the first real-life smart grid community in the world which delivers the world’s first results from a total concept smart grid deployment project.

The city currently involves 25 households connected with each other and fitted with fully functioning micro combined heat and power systems (CHP). Systems in place include high efficiency boilers, hybrid pumps, smart meters, PV panels, electric vehicle charging stations and other smart household appliances which when combined together make up the smart energy system.

“With the share of renewable energy going up strongly over the next decades, the rising demand for electricity, and consumers who are increasingly providing their own energy supply, it is evident that smart grids will have an essential position in our future energy system. PowerMatching City plays a pioneering role in the development of smart grids and in the transition towards a sustainable energy system,” said Frits Bliek, Program Coordinator, PowerMatching City.

It is hoped that the grid will continue to grow, with the next phase set to include a further 70 homes. Follow the link below for the video!

PowerMatching City (www.PowerMatchingCity.nl)

 

 

EU on the RIO+20 summit

The first Earth Summit took place twenty years ago in Rio. The global community created this summit because they wanted a more equitable and sustainable model for the course of human development. These days, sustainable progress has been made and the world has changed a lot. The RIO+20 summit will have different challenges than last year. They need to think about the changing global landscape, the international economic crisis, rising population levels, global resources and the still unacceptable level of poverty in the world. So there is a great responsibility on the community of state to make new strategies on this RIO+2O summit  and search for more inclusiveness and sustainability.

The irresponsible behavior of the financial sector, lax regulatory oversight and deep-seated imbalances were the causes of today’s economic crisis. These deep-seated imbalances need to be corrected if we want a more sustainable growth for the world. And  it’s not just the global economic imbalances but also the imbalances in the ecological footprints. And although, in the 20th century, the quality of life rose very much, this came at the price of unsustainable use of scarce global resources like fuel, metals, minerals, timber, water and ecosystems.

A Challenge in the world of today is to work together, especially when you realize that by 2050, the world population will have reached 9 billion. If we don’t work together and think about how to best use our precious resources, we will need two planets to sustain us. It’s up to the RIO Summit to take the discussions about stable economies and increased growth, discussed at the G20 Summit in Mexico, and include an inclusive and sustainable path to reach these goals.

The EU really wants a concrete Rio agenda so they can discuss all their goals and targets for key areas that underpin a green economy. They want to talk about water, the oceans, land, ecosystems, forests, sustainable energy and resource efficiency. And the goals they have are all linked to sustainable growth, poverty, social development, food security and nutrition. But the EU won’t be able to make their case at Rio if they don’t get the support, engagement and mobilization of both the public and private sector. So it’s up to RIO+20 to strengthen engagement of the private and civil sector, because these are the real engines behind our economies in sustainable development.

The  Millennium Development Goals make that the EU remains committed to achieve their goals. And they are also ready to engage in a discussion on Sustainable Development Goals suggested by some G77 countries. An example of their commitment to global sustainability is the EU Sustainable Energy for All Summit that was organized, in coordination with the UN, in Brussels on April 16 of this year. A new EU Energizing Development initiative was announced. This initiative should provide sustainable energy services to 500 million people by 2030. And the European Commission is currently also establishing a technical assistance facility to provide governments with the expertise to engage in reforms and to develop their own National Energy Access Strategies. The EU wants to mobilize at least 400 million euros over the next two years to go into these two strategies.

Because we are in an economical crisis, we need to find innovative ways of developing financial assistance. A valuable resource to fund development could be a global Financial Transaction Tax. This could also ensure that it’s not just the financial sector that needs to pay a contribution to the economy. So the revenue generated by a European Financial Transaction tax should be put into the future EU budget to help ensure that the EU continues to be one of the world’s biggest providers of development assistance.

Breaking Out of the Silo

There has been talk of changing the way we live in order to benefit both the planet and each other for many years. Countless schemes have been created to reduce carbon emissions, increase solar energy, encourage the use of public transportation, increase child safety and boost quality of life for all. But these schemes have all been run independent of each other, the so-called silo structure. However, it’s fast becoming clear that this method simply does not work. The Smart Cities venture combines all of these aspects, with the overall aim of using technology to improve life. However, ICT analyst Ovum suggests that the move to smarter, ICT literate cities is slower than we would have hoped.

“While most of us live in cities, moves to integrate the technologies that link us all, to create a better standard of living, are being stymied by a lack of resources and poor planning.”

While suppliers have been able to develop technology to aid with almost any aspect of life, from crime to traffic, the implementation stage may be what causes the most difficulty. While the physical aspect of putting into place the hardware, such as sensors, that is needed may be a time consuming process, it is the changing of people’s minds and behavior patterns that is set to cause the most difficulty.

The Smart City initiative needs to find a way to foster collective action to improve social interactions. This is just one of the topics to be discussed during the Smart Cities Europe conference due to be hosted early this week.

Birmingham gets EU funds for ultra-fast broadband network

Birmingham is setting up an ultra-fast broadband network. This project is part of the government’s ‘super-connected cities’ competition. The aim of this competition is to construct high speed networks in ten UK cities and using the £100 million in funding that is available.

The project is also receiving a £4.8 million grant state aid from the European Commission since they found that the project is in line with EU state aid rules and it will be genuinely open to all operators and therefore promote competition.

The EU has Broadband Guidelines, and one of the reasons they granted this state aid to Birmingham is because their project is in some aspects exceeding the minimum requirements of these EU guidelines. The EU minimum to grant open access to alternative operators is only seven years, but Birmingham will be granting this open access for at least 25 years.

Joaquin Almunia, Vice President of the European Commission and Commisioner responsible for competition,  said that it’s important to promote growth in line with EU’s Digital Agenda, and investments in ultra-fast broadband networks contribute to this. So another reason why Birmingham is getting the state aid is because their network was designed in a competitive manner.

The network will be available on a wholesale basis, which ensures more competition at retail level. Most of the time, these networks are built with the help of taxpayers’ money, so it is important that there is a thriving competition on the subsidized networks. Local businesses and citizens should be able to benefit from continuously improving broadband services at competitive prices.

There are two districts in Birmingham where private operators have no or limited investments plans in the next few years. This means that consumers would only be able to use basic broadband services or expensive leased line business services. Because of this, Birmingham will target theses areas with their new network. It will also offer some significant enhanced technological characteristics when you compare the network to other existing networks. These technologies are expected to meet demands from SME’s, especially those in the creative industries.

In addition to the £100 million that Birmingham wants to invest in this super-fast broadband network, they have announced plans to invest the same amount of money in a public Wi-Fi network in the city which would make use of infrastructures in the city like tower blocks or lampposts.