Category Archives: cloud

New curriculum: A crash course in the digital economy

Digital economy

Higher education has a well recognised crisis: the gap between what is taught in business schools and what is expected by managers in high growth industries of their incoming employees.

It is a chasm that leads to unemployment, underemployment, and disengagement for the Millennial workforce, and frustration for enterprises who cannot find and retain qualified employees for jobs unfilled.

Higher Education institutions tend to resist innovation. They are risk-averse, while being overly concerned with maintaining tradition. It is easier for departments and professors to keep doing what they have been doing in prescriptive, conventional methods rather than find new ways to deliver education as a service in innovative and effective ways.

The solution is to engage students in active learning by applying the latest business research and enterprise architecture models to real business challenges. As a result of incorporating the use of social business, big data, mobility and cloud computing into the curriculum students leave prepared with the skills they’ll immediately use to service customers and collaborate with colleagues and partners in today’s global and digital economy.

This is exactly what Hult International Business School and IBM have partnered to do.

In an effort to combat the growing skills gap, IBM and Hult International Business School have partnered to create a first-of-its-kind curriculum that is focused on the emergence of the digital service economy, dedicated to preparing today’s graduate student with the critical skills they’ll need to be competitive and successful in today’s increasingly social and digital business landscape.

IBM and Hult are working to educate and enable students with skills that best serve today’s global, mobile and social customer. This new academic program provides Hult students with the opportunity to deepen technical and business skills in areas such as enterprise social networking, which has seen a significant uptake in adoption over the past five years and continues to grow and transform how organisations do business.

The new curriculum is part of Hult International Business School’s Corporate Partnership Elective program, and brings together MBA students with IBMers to help address the need for skills in areas like social business and analytics. Hult approaches the partnership with IBM as an opportunity for systematic innovation to improve its capability to bridge the gap between business education and the skills/competencies global hiring managers seek.

Microsoft introduce Lab of Things

Lab

Today at its Faculty Summit, Microsoft Research introduced the beta of Lab of Things, a new platform from the company that will support sensor information from the physical world in a simple way, allowing for more experiment by more people in more places.

Lab of Things is a system that links together physical data collection and Microsoft’s HomeOS. HomeOS  is Microsoft’s bid to turn your house into something slightly more automated. If you want to run an experiment that employs sensor data, Lab of Things will provide a backend for you. Also, you can access your experiment via mobile devices, store and share data in the cloud, and adjust the experiment itself by visiting the site itself.

Assume that you wanted to run an experiment that involved collecting temperature data from the top of radio towers around your city. Once you installed your sensors on the towers, and linked their data flow to the Internet, you could employ Lab of Things as the tool to collect, monitor, and analyse the information. Microsoft calls the service “near real-time.”

One of the Lab of Things’ objectives is to lower friction between idea and experiment by cutting out the need for scientists and software engineers. Here, have some code that works. This will allow for more total experiment, and also more experiment by the less well-funded; DIY hackers.

The lab costs nothing, but there is a caveat: If you are an academic collaborator, you can freely use the Lab of Things for your research. The Lab of Things license does not allow commercial use.

You can snag the beta Lab of Things SDK here.

How the Internet of Things will change almost everything.

In a guest post for Forbes, John Humphreys, VP-marketing for cloud management software provider Egenera equates the Internet of Things to a central nervous system of the Planet.

If you think the digital world is crowded now, wait until you see what the next few years will bring. Today, there are roughly two Internet-connected devices for every man, woman and child on the planet. By 2025, analysts are forecasting that this ratio will rise past six. This means we can expect to grow to nearly 50 billion Internet-connected devices in the next decade.

Over the next decade, most of the connected device growth will come from very small sensors that are primarily doing machine-to-machine communications and acting as the digital nerve endings for highly dynamic global sense-and-respond systems.

Driven by a revolution in cheap sensor technology, we have, for the first time, the ability to impart a central nervous system on our planet. This fabric of technology will allow us to measure systems on a global scale and at the same time offer a never before seen resolution.

The Role of the Cloud

If all of these sensors act as the central nervous system for the planet, then the cloud is the brain. It’s the place where all the data flooding in will be collected, collated, analyzed and turned into information and that information turned into knowledge.

In a world containing vast arrays of constantly changing sensors, the challenges for the cloud include scale of operations and rate of change. Whether it’s for a social network, a scientific study or for resource optimisations, a key characteristic of the Internet of things (IoT) is its massive scale and self-organising nature.

The challenge is the temporary nature of the network. As such the next generation of the cloud will need to malleable enough to scale autonomously, adaptive enough to handle constantly changing connections and resilient enough to stand up to the huge ebbs and flows in data that will occur. To meet this challenge, cloud computing will need to accelerate its evolution and rapidly move past its current form.